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DELAYS CAUSED BY A CORONER’S INQUEST

If a death is not from natural causes a coroner’s inquest will be held.  He or she will open the inquest in order to issue a burial order or cremation certificate as well as hearing evidence about the identity of the deceased.  The inquest is then adjourned until a later date.  This could take place many months after the death but that does not mean that probate has to be delayed.  As well as issuing permission for the funeral to go ahead, the coroner can issue a certificate of the fact of death which can be used to notify banks, financial institutions and other organisations of the death and to make an application for a grant of probate or letters of administration.

Fortunately a coroner’s inquest is relatively unusual.  For more practical advice on what to do after death where a coroner is not involved, here are some useful links:-

/probate-explained/what-to-do-after-a-death/

https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/what-to-do-when-someone-dies

https://www.gov.uk/after-a-death/overview

http://www.ageuk.org.uk/money-matters/legal-issues/what-to-do-when-someone-dies/what-to-do-first-when-someone-dies/

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